A review of Memory Painter by Gwendolyn Womack

Despite all that, the author makes the story come together and the book is a light fun summer read, especially for those who like dabbling in reincarnation stories. Being a historical fantasy with a spiritual sub-plot the story also brings past social mores, politics, and people from far-flung places to life, as the reader and protagonists rush about from ancient Egypt, through Russia, to other parts unknown.

A review of Enchanted August by Brenda Bowen

Reviewed by Ruth Latta In Bowen’s Enchanted August, Lottie and Rose are New York mothers of young children, dissatisfied at the way their lives are working out. Lottie’s husband seems to have lost interest in her. Rose’s husband is writing thrillers under a pseudonym, but her poetic talent has been overshadowed by her maternal role. The two women meet at the bulletin board of their children’s preschool, both drawn to a notice about a Maine cottage for rent for August.

A Conversation with Brenda Bowen

The author of Enchanted August talks about how the idea for her latest novel developed, on the relationship between her book and the original Enchanted April, her feelings about Maine, her literary influences, her writing process, her perfect summer day, and her own Hopewell Cottage imaginary houseguests.

A review of Autoplay by Julie Babcock

It is tempting to say that Autoplay by Julie Babcock is a collection of poems about Ohio. It is and more. One way to put order to this book, a task that is almost if not totally impossible to do, is to separate the poems into categories. The Ohio poems would be one category. Another category would be poems dealing with childhood and adulthood

Interview with Mary Kay Andrews

The author of Beach Town talks about why she chose to write about Hollywood, the research she did, the real town behind Cypress Key, her Floridian setting, her characters (including the dachshund), her favourite beach town, her work in progress, and more.

A review of Words Without Music by Philip Glass

There is so much to learn here, not just about Glass, but about ourselves—how to live, how to learn, how to create. Towards the end of the book, Glass talks about his work on his Cocteau Trilogy in which he says, of Cocteau, that he “is teaching about creativity in terms of the power of the artist, which we now understand to be the power of transformation” (378) The same can be said of Words Without Music.

A review of Finding Love by Carolyn Martinez

Martinez’ new book, Finding Love Again, is another book full of stories about people who have made a go of love on their second or more attempts. Though the stories are presented without too much editorial interruption, Martinez provides a kind of cumulative wisdom as the book progresses, building up to practical tips to go along with such a wealth of anecdotal advice that it’s hard not to feel like it’s entirely possible to find true love, at any age.

Interview with Joshua Braff

The author of The Daddy Diaries talks about his new book and its parallels with his own life, about the challenges of drawing from real life for his fiction, about the dearth of stay-at-home dads in fiction, about being a house-husband, the challenges of writing at home with children, about where, and how he writes, and lots more.

A review of The Chocolate League by Rah and Jahi Humphrey

During my daily reading, Osage County First Grade followed the adventures of The Chocolate League as they found fun summer things to do despite the closure of their park. Water balloon fights, and jump rope, and running games with chase and tag, pranks and dares, and visits to the candy store, parents sitting on the front stoop, hurrying home as dusk is falling fill pages illustrated with bright and colorful drawings provided by Fanny Liem.