A review of The Fateful Apple by Venus Thrash

Reviewed by Molly Martin

The Fateful Apple
by Venus Thrash
Urban poets & lyricists
Paperback: 78 pages, March 9, 2014, ISBN-13: 978-0983535652, RRP$14.39

Venus Thrash open The Fateful Apple deep in the heart of the Garden of Eden and moves toward Tutankhamen’s tomb, continues on to Atlanta, before  mentioning The Tree of Life, The Tree of Knowledge and womankind bearing the brunt of Eve’s disobedience. The reader is left breathless, but driven to turn the page and check the words coming next.

Individual elegies bear single word titles or short phrases, drawing the reader into the work to learn what the poet is offering in each. “Homage,” “Womanology,” “Uncivil,” “Home,” and “Twirl” are a few of the verses having single word titles. “Approva”l is one woman’s poignant yearning to have men view her as a woman who happens to be lesbian and not as one of the boys. Three separate works are devoted to Rincon, Georgia, while others adjoining those three, include poems that address growing up and dealing with the reality of prejudice and ignorance.

Self-probing verses ‘Cutting It Close,” “Let Me Come Back,” and “To the Fems” are offered as unambiguous examinations of personal identity. The work in this collection offers a multiplicity of subjects and emotions.  The Fateful Apple is a powerful work presented by a woman who knows herself,is satisfied with who she is, and sees no reason for apologizing for being herself. While I do not live her lifestyle, I admire anyone who faces life straight on, knows who and what they are, and marches into the fact of life with eyes wide open.

A finalist in the 2012 Jean Feldman Poetry Prize and the 2009 Arktoi Books Poetry Prize, Poet, Educator, Parent, Thrash received a MFA in fiction and poetry from American University, has completed a short story collection, and is working on a second poetry work.

This work is not for everyone, as it contains some stark, raw language, not profanity, but language with sexual suggestion, however, if you like hard hitting, no holds barred, tell it like it is, non-saccharine verses, then The Fateful Apple will provide a powerful change-of-pace poetry read.

Reviewed by: molly martin
www.angelfire.com/ok4/mollymartin
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20+ years classroom teacher
www.angelfire.com/ok4/mollymartin
www.AuthorsDen.com/mjhollingshead
20+ years classroom teacher

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