Category: Non fiction reviews

A review of Garibaldi: Invention of a Hero by Lucy Riall

Riall sees the mythos of Garibaldi as an effective if unrealistic public relations tool. His frequent intransigence and independence was as valuable as if he had been the brainless tool of Cavour, Cavour’s successor, or Vittorio Emanuele. In the pursuit of her message she inundates the reader with trivia, which, however relevant, could have been more effectively presented.

A review of How To Make Your Book Stand Out in a Crowd by Dave and Lillian Brummet

Why would they even think of your book when they decide that a book is what they’re going to buy? The answer is all about how effectively you’ve marketed yourself and your book. So easy to read, reference books like Purple Snowflake Marketing’s How to Make Your Book Stand Out in a Crowd (and it really is a crowd, and becoming more crowded all the time) are very important for authors.

A review of The Dangerous Book for Boys, Australian Edition

As with the original Dangerous Book, the book contains a kind of muted, classy beauty with secret looking pen and ink drawings, coloured plates which are true in look to their original sources, and a broad range of diagrams and photos. The attractive marble end papers are now gold, and the whole book has a lovely richness about it.

A review of The Collins Australian Dictionary 9th Edition

The latest Collins Australian Dictionary is a beauty and has everything you want in a dictionary. It’s both ultra-modern and classic; big in scope and size, but still fits on the bookshelf; attractive but not the slightest bit obsequious; serious but with its nod to lingo and mediaspeak, still fun. If you don’t already have a major dictionary reference tool, this is an exceptional one, and though not cheap, an excellent investment.

A review of Red Hot Internet Publicity by Penny Sansevieri

When it comes to the virtual book tour, Red Hot Internet Publicity really shines. Sansevieri has been running virtual book tours for authors for a few years now, and although her services aren’t inexpensive (she’s got plenty of inside knowledge which makes the tours effective), this book is.

A review of Naples ‘44 by Norman Lewis

Lewis is a compassionate, clear-headed witness to heartrending tragedy, but there are many moments of irony and humour here as well. There is plenty of poverty, horror and suffering in these pages; yet there is resilience too. People survive.

A review of Shakespeare the Thinker by A.D. Nuttall

Nuttall uses wit and personal recollections to illuminate his text. The result is lively and relaxed although he makes no concessions to difficulties. His explanations are cogent and full. As a book by a writer worth reading for his own sake and as one of the dozen books that any reader of Shakespeare should have, this is not only an essential book, it is a delight.