Category: Book Reviews

Book Reviews

A Review of Tamasin Day-Lewis’ Simply the Best: The Art of Seasonal Cooking

The book is divided into sections based on the seasons, with brief essays at the start of each, which contain bits of reminiscence on Day-Lewis’ childhood, her experiences with foods, her feelings about and philosophy. Between each season are the columns, each addressing a different food, or local producer, followed by recipes either inspired by her experiences or by the artisan she writes about. There are handmade cheese companies, deer farmers, eel smokers, baby asparagus growers, bread bakers, fishmongers, trips to Italy for hand crafted olive oil, honey, slow food, and truffles, fresh country markets, handmade chocolates, small but perfectly run shops, trips to Ireland, exquisite restaurants, and guesthouses, and home cooked meals.

A Review of Gabriel Gate’s Weekend on a Plate

A Review of Gabriel Gate’s Weekend on a Plate  Gaté has a very delicate prose style, which is both casual and sophisticated, evoking clean white tableclothes, fresh coffee, crusty breads, quality wines, and herb rich meat dishes prepared with care.…

A Review of Peter Bowerman’s The Well Fed Writer

Reading The Well Fed Writer, you can’t help but feel excited and positive about the possibility of making a good living as a Freelance Commercial Writer (FLCW in Bowermanspeak). Bowerman’s many years of experience in sales and marketing, and obvious…

A review of Manhattan Monologues by Louis Auchincloss

Auchincloss is an inheritor of the territory once handled by Henry James and Edith Wharton, territory that is sometimes dismissed without the understanding that it remains an important literary and social realm. Marginally observed, the rich are rarely discussed with…

Buxom Cakes and Homemade Sin: A Review of Death By Chocolate Cakes by Marcel Desaulniers

Desaulniers’ prose is nearly as seductive as his way with chocolate. No pedantic, chef-on-high stuff here: Desaulniers writes about baking with a wayward grin, assuring us that cake is not only food for the gods, but that it is, after all, just cake. Made in kitchens just like ours, with chocolate bought in the local grocery, using “conventional” bake ware and regular (not restaurant) ovens, Desaulniers’ cakes are ones we really can bake ourselves.

A Review of the Describer’s dictionary by David Grambs

The reason I like this reference so much is that if I don’t find exactly what I’m looking for, I may very well find something I like better. Further, this is the kind of reference you can actually read. Open this book to any chapter (segment) on, say, “hair”. You’ll find several quotes about “hair” that are entertaining and may stir your own creative juices before you even get to the part that that lists adjectives for all kinds of– ahem– tresses, locks, strands, shocks, hanks, coils, tendrils, curls, ringlets or swirls.