Tag: fiction

A Review of Growing Young by Dean Warren

Dean Warren’s newest book, Growing Young, proves once again that he is a master of this writing genre. He writes of a futuristic society while weaving in facts of things happening in our own time; scientific and genetic research, unemployment,…

Interview with Noah Lukeman

Noah Lukeman, literary agent and author of The Plot Thickens and TheFirst Five Pages talks about his books, the differences between writing and agenting, the chief function of books and films, trends for literary heroes, the state of the publishing industry, self-publishing, his next…

A Review of Goodbye Tsugumi by Banana Yoshimoto

While the novel is sweet and charming, it lacks the power and edge, and even the quirky oddness that makes Yoshimoto’s earlier work so intriguing. The ending too is a bit forced, leaving the reader unsatisfied. Despite the lack of…

How to Write Damn Good Fiction by James Frey

How to Write Damn Good Fiction is not a writing book for beginners. It doesn’t cover the basics of characterisation, plotting, dialogue, grammar or novel construction. What it does cover is the difference between writing that is mediocre and writing that…

A Review of The Scar by China Mieville

Much of what makes Mieville’s work so appealing to readers not normally enamoured with fantasy literature is classic literary technique. His settings are very well mapped out, his characters are complex and, strong and very real, even when they are…

A Review of Baudolino by Umberto Eco

In this, his fourth novel, professional liar Umberto Eco spins the yarn of Baudolino, a fellow artificer hailing from Eco’s hometown of Alessandria and possessing more than a bit of the author’s personality. Like Eco, Baudolino is a master of…

A review of Going Home by Michael de Valle

But it is when de Valle brings death itself directly into the story that his prose really shines. The complex relationship between life and death are the centre of action in “Two slices of blue”, a story about a child who is given back his eyesight from a donor’s corneas. The tightness of the narrative is superbly handled as de Valle moves back and forth between the moment of death/damage, a wife’s realisation that she’s lost her husband, and a parent’s experience of their child’s accident and subsequent operation.

A Review of Coraline by Neil Gaiman

The whole tone is a bit Alice in Wonderland like, and even has a talking cat, silly songs, cryptic messages, characters that metamorphosis, and the kind of almost surreal play between waking and dreaming, life and death, shadow and light which made…

A Review of French Spirits by Jeffrey Greene

French Spirits begins with the earth’s axis tilting away from the sun and sliding “down into the narrow pit of gray winter months” and ends in the Burgundian winter mists, the warmth of life and human celebration contrasting with the eternal…