Tag: young adult

A review of The Gifts of Life by Oliver Smuhar

Oliver Smuhar’s The Gifts of Life is a deep and entrancing novel, with its strong fantasy based plotline and elements of the coming of age genre. The rich and well thought out characters created clever relationships and delightful banter.

A review of Scarlet and Ivy – The Last Secret by Sophie Cleverly

Sophie Cleverly is very descriptive. When I read her books I feel like I am watching a Scarlet and Ivy movie. To get the most out of this book, I would recommend reading the entire series from book one, which is The Lost Twin, which I highly recommend as well. As with the other books in this series, I loved everything about The Last Secret

A review of A Man Called Ove By Fredrick Backman

An incredibly moving novel, I am glad I read this book as a ‘gateway’ book to other adult books. I would suggest this is a book for young adults (15-18) and adults, as some themes can be quite intense for younger readers. Overall, a beautiful story with strong messages and an emotional ending – you’ll need the tissue box for this one!

A review of The Harper Effect by Taryn Bashford

The whole mix-up of the book, with elements of tennis, teenage and torture, it makes it relatable for people aged 13 to young adults, especially girls. The repeated message of following your dreams rings clear throughout, even when mixed up in love, relationships and secrets.

A review of The Silent Invasion by James Bradley

Callie’s character is very insightful and from her perspective in the book, she describes the world with similes and personifications, creating and painting beautiful or terrible images. It shows the world in all its beauty and horror through the words on a page, but seems so much more than that.

A review of Wonder By R. J. Palacio

The main character in Wonder is August Pullman: Auggie. He is a funny and sensitive ten-year-old boy from New York who was born with a facial deformity. The story follows his first year at school, after having been home schooled. Auggie wants to feel normal but this is hard when people stare at him and avoid him. 

A review of Take Three Girls by Simmone Howell, Cath Crowley, and Fiona Wood

This novel is an enjoyable, feel-good read which is easy to settle into from the very beginning. A strong stand-alone novel which I would highly recommend, particularly to young females aged 13-18. Take Three Girls is written with the perfect expression of teenage girls trying to make it through high school, figure out who they are and what the world has in store for them.

A review of The Curse In The Candle Light Scarlet and Ivy by Sophie Cleverly

Through the changing of friendships and leaderships, Ebony soon calls all the shots and organises a party celebrating All Hallows Eve. At this party a truth is revealed and now Muriel has the upper hand, leading to a tight situation for the other girls. This situation involves breaking out of a cage, breaking a door and confronting enemies.